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Posted in Art, Ecoculture
15/12 2012

Phôs graphè

Phos graphe is a work that comes from a reflection on the concepts of light and private space. In fact, light pollution, more and more a problem of our contemporary world, deprives us of the natural darkness of the night.

©Massimo Di Nonno

The title takes the two Greek words from which we derive the word photography:
phôs light and graphè writing.

Phôs graphè is a project of Massimo Di Nonno about light pollution: the light levels change naturally present in the night, they change the perception of the private space.
The author is fascinated by the light in the rooms where he has been. From Milan to Berlin, London, and the Czech Republic, the author collects many images of the “light that travels, that spreads in the space, also in the most intimate moments like the night.”


©Massimo Di Nonno

It passes through the windows arriving on the walls of the rooms, creating shadows or illuminating objects and places, giving a new look at the figures of our private thoughts.

The light travels around the space. It is pervasive, it can be able to reach our more intimate place, the one that we live during the night.
As previousli said it passes through the windows projecting itself on the rooms’ walls, getting longer shadows and lighting objects.
The places, the lights, the objects, the shadows join our intimate thoughts before sleeping.
The light arrives from the outside, a light that change our private worlds.


©Massimo Di Nonno

The exhibition phos graphe reproduced the internal-type of a room through the creation of total darkness.
The darkness of the room is interrupted by the artificial light produced outside and voluntarily accepted in the exhibition space: from urban street lamps, headlights of cars, from the neon signs of the shops. The photographs mounted on Plexiglas, and placed in frames made by hand, are not lit from within, but from outside.

The works on display are unique. Thay are signed by the author and by the director of the gallery Around Gallery and the printer Robert Bernè.


©Massimo Di Nonno


©Massimo Di Nonno

 

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