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Posted in Education
19/10 2009

LIGHT TALES COMPETITION:

LIGHT TALES COMPETITION: THE WINNERS OF THE FIRST EDITION!

Gianna Batistoni, Basar Erdener and Giorgio Cattano. Honourable mention to Paolo Portaluri The first Light Tales competition has finally found its winners. However, it is worth noting that at least ten essays were on the shortlist of favourites, demonstrating the overall excellent quality of the submissions to the competition.
Congratulations to the winner, Gianna Batistoni (Italy), with her story entitled Albaluna. Basar Erdener (Turkey) was the runner-up with his essay, How I Started to See. Another Italian writer, Giorgio Cattano, came third with Una luce sola.
The panel of judges also assigned an honourable mention to L’incontro by Paolo Portaluri (Italy) for the mixed-media artwork illustrating his text. A tale told through images, preceded by a few verses.

Nevertheless, the honour goes to the illustration and writing together, since the verses provide a necessary key to understanding the story that Portaluri suggests through a succession of five panels depicting a human figure and its reflected image, which becomes sharper from frame
to frame, a lamp, a bottle … and light, especially light. The panels transition through the bright light of day, light cast by a lamp, twilight before nightfall, and finally, the low light of the moon.
Tender and very well written, the work by Gianna Batistoni pulls at the heartstrings. Albaluna is a little girl with an extreme sensitivity to light, “a veil of pale silk that the sun yellows and consumes,” a “paper doll made of tissue” that her grandmother keeps indoors, protected from
sunlight. Albaluna has never seen other children and “looking into the mirror, she had the strange notion that human beings changed colour as they got older, that children were little unripe fruits
and, as time brought her closer to maturity, she too would have long chestnut coloured hair…”
Then one day she met another child by chance and caught a glimpse of a new world, outside of her home, sparking her desire to discover a possible new light. Even for her, for whom daytime is forbidden.

The beautiful story develops with grace and sensitivity, with light emerging as a precious gift.
Natural or artificial, real or metaphorical, light is life! This message, and how the author manages to convey it, made this essay worthy of first prize.
Writers participated in this competition for the opportunity to have their work published and read.
There were no cash prizes, only personal satisfaction. As a symbolic gesture, however, Gianna will be presented with an object that holds great value for those who appreciate design and light, the
AJ Table Lamp, still produced today by Louis Poulsen to an original design by Arne Jacobsen. The table version has a tiltable head and an unusual asymmetrical shape peculiar to this lamp, making it a timeless classic. The hope is that the lamp will “illuminate” the author in writing her next work!
The central character in the story by Basar Erdener, awarded second prize, is a nearsighted 28- year-old who can’t remember where he has laid his glasses. He can scarcely see and is running late for a business meeting. Ultimately, he never makes it to his meeting because, at a certain point, his eyes begin to speak and defy him, accusing him, in a paradoxical conversation, of unfairly blaming them for his lack of sight whilst the blame lies elsewhere.
“It is your mind that sees, not us. It is your mind”. A difficult concept for him to absorb until he finally bids farewell to the meeting, and perhaps also to his career, and begins to look around him and discovers a number of things. “This is the story of how I started to see”, concludes the author.
Perhaps a better choice of words would have been “to look”, because this is the crux of the entire story, the enormous difference between seeing things and really looking at them, understanding their intimate nature. The path that Basar takes us down to make his point is the icing on the cake,
and he uses an original and playful medium to convey a very serious message.
A little girl, a young man and – making a somewhat odd trio – an elderly man. Una luce sola, by Giorgio Cattano, talks about a presumably older man who remains alone in the city one summer.
“You would only get bored at the sea,” his son reminds him. The older man is not that upset, though he is only sorry not to be with his granddaughter whom he seldom sees. He will be the only resident in the large building where he lives – all the others have left for their holidays. By day, when the sun begins to filter through the blinds, and the wall beside the bed “is alight with
fragments of sun”, he is at peace with himself. “A hundred, a thousand sparks of flame dance on the plaster; they are a window onto exotic, faraway lands that I explore every day. It is the magic
television of my dreams.” But by night, darkness brings terror, “time stands still and no dream seems to make it pass faster.”
Sad? Not really, because, for those who know where to look – this is the positive moral that we believe we see in the subsequent developments of the story – life always offers solace.

 

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Posted in Education
4/04 2009

LIGHT TALES COMPETITION

LIGHT TALES COMPETITION


Une ville européenne, en 2055… La nuit était déjà là, mais comme d’habitude personne ne pouvait s’en rendre compte, car la ville entière était baignée dans une clarté éblouissante. Depuis très longtemps les citadins avaient oublié cette ancienne expression de nuit et ne se préoccupaient plus du lever du jour ou du coucher du soleil. Les grandes horloges installées à chaque carrefour suffisaient à renseigner ceux qui souhaitaient savoir si la journée officielle était finie. Et pour les plus curieux, un bref coup d’oeil vers les traits de couleurs pastel qui lacéraient le ciel d’un jaune laiteux, permettait d’identifier facilement cette période d’éclairage artificiel.

What you have just read is the beginning of the original language text of The Lost Night [La nuit disparue] a futuristic story that Roger Narboni wrote for the The Portale della Luce – www.lightingacademy.org and Anno Luce. Mr. Narboni needs no introduction as a lighting designer. His projects, his ideas, his unique approach to the social aspects of lighting speak for him. A key example of his commitment is his recent founding of the association, Concepteurs
Lumière Sans Frontières – Lighting Designers Without Borders (for more information, see the Lighting Organizations area of the Portale).
However, we knew little or nothing about Roger Narboni the author, partly because it is one thing, and an uncommon one at that, to describe one’s projects clearly and it is totally another to test one’s skills with a novella. Even though light is one of the main "characters", a story needs a beginning, a body and an end to make it interesting reading. We can find all this in Narboni’s tale, and it is so well structured that we heartily recommend it to our readers. As we consider it a gift, La Nuit
disparue will be published up at Christmas time in the Dossiers area of our magazine, that usually hosts the most interesting texts. There is a dual goal in this initiative. On the one hand, there is the obvious interest in publishing a new work that marks the literary debut of one of the
greatest lighting designers on the international scene. On the other, there is the perhaps even more ambitious goal of using the story to launch a Literary Contest that is open to all, but restricted
to stories that speak of light. It does not matter whether the authors are lighting designers like Narboni, or established professionals, or students or simply enthusiasts. There is no limit as to length or restriction as to genre: a novella, short story, play or poetry.
The essential requirement is that light – artificial and even natural – be the logical "main character".
The competition, that it’s entitled simply Light Tales, is sponsored by Fondazione Targetti and its exclusive purpose is to promote the culture of light.

All texts must be submitted to the editors of lighting academy not later than 31 May 2009. All entries will be judged for originality, content and expression.

The judging panel will consist of Roger Narboni, Stella Targetti director of the Fondazione Targetti and Beatrice Santini, editor in chief of the Portale della Luce, and others yet to be appointed. The three best works will be published on the Portale della Luce and disseminated through all appropriate channels starting with Anno Luce and the main lighting journals. If the quality of the compositions permits, they will be published in a single volume. Entries may be submitted in English, Italian, French or Spanish. Now in its third edition, Anno Luce is a real book that contains some of the best original articles and papers that have appeared on the Portale. The main topic is light and all its facets: design, art, social, culture and ethics and the stated aim is to offer as complete an overview as possible of the world of light today. Anno Luce is distributed free of charge to the world’s foremost lighting designers and to those involved with light in education, art, advertising and, of course, industry. Over the years the journal has increased in size and circulation.

If you wish to participate in the Light Tales Competition, please send your works to
Beatrice Santini
Targetti Sankey
Via Pratese, 164
50145 Firenze
b.santini@targetti.it

The deadline is May 31, 2009. Works will be not returned Winners will be announced by September 30, 2009
All illustrations here reproduced have been realized by Roger Narboni

 

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